RSSVolume 8

IJLLD 8.2

IJLLD 8.2

| December 31, 2020

(Frontsmatter) Robert J. Dickey. International and Discourse is in Our Name … 5 Monika Mayrhofer. Victims, Security Threats or Agents? – Framing Climate Change-related Mobility in International Human Rights Documents … 9 Michelle Anne A. Marasigan & Rachelle Ballesteros-Lintao. Presentation and Comprehensibility of Public Policies in Online News Articles …35 Anton Osminkin. Pronominal Adverbs Based […]

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8.2 Osminkin

| December 31, 2020

Anton Osminkin. (2020). Pronominal Adverbs Based on Here-, There-, and Where- as Textual Connectors in Legal Discourse. International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse 8(2), 57-85. Abstract: This paper examines the connectors based on here-, there-, and where-, as used in legal discourse. Although they are regularly mentioned in specialised literature (Crystal, 1988; Tiersma, 1999; […]

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8.2 Marasigan & Ballesteros-Lintao

| December 31, 2020

Michelle Anne A. Marasigan & Rachelle Ballesteros-Lintao. (2020). Presentation and Comprehensibility of Public Policies in Online News Articles. International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse 8(2), 35-56. Abstract: Language is the primary vehicle in which public policies are expressed for “all concepts in law are linguistically constituted and expressed” (Silbey, 1989, p. 1) to the […]

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8.2 Mayrhofer

| December 31, 2020

Monika Mayrhofer. (2020). Victims, Security Threats or Agents? – Framing Climate Change-related Mobility in International Human Rights Documents. International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse 8(2), 9-33. Abstract: Climate change-related human mobility is a contested issue. For over a decade, UN human rights bodies have contributed to international discussions on displacement, migration and other forms […]

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8.2 Dickey

| December 31, 2020

Robert J. Dickey. (2020). International and Discourse is in Our Name. International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse 8(2), 5-8. Abstract: This introductory article describes the journal’s focus on “international” and “discourse,” and introduces the articles in this issue. Keywords: soft-genres, international, discourse, law, language PDF

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IJLLD 8.1

IJLLD 8.1

| September 2, 2020

IJLLD Volume 8.1 (2020) (Frontsmatter) Robert J. Dickey. Ethical Publication at the Nexus of Law, Language and Discourse … 5 Simon Mlundi. Informal Instant Translation in the Tanzanian Courts: Law Professionals’ Perceptions on the Efficacy of English versus Kiswahili in Adjudication of Justice … 25 Ed Conduit. The Sexism of Transitive Verbs in Legal Process […]

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8.1 Cameron

| September 2, 2020

Phil Cameron. (2020). The Language of Cyberattacks. International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse 8(1), 79-94. Abstract: This essay is a post-structuralist analysis of legal systems and terminology used in government-based high technology activities. In the pandemic contact tracing post 9-11 era of high technology global security, there is no single determinate structure for the […]

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8.1 EL-Sakran

| September 2, 2020

Tharwat M. EL-Sakran. (2020). Lawyers’ Perceptions of Forensic Linguistic Evidence in Arab Countries: A Call for Collaboration. International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse 8(1), 60-78. Abstract: Although forensic linguists (FLs) are being increasingly used in various Western countries, the concept of lawyers in the Arab world hiring a FL has not found its way […]

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8.1 Conduit

| September 2, 2020

Ed Conduit. (2020). The Sexism of Transitive Verbs in Legal Process. International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse 8(1), 46-59. Abstract: The use of grammatical transitivity by the criminal law is considered. This question is discussed: is it appropriate for courts to use a discourse in which unthinking men do actions that cause harm to […]

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8.1 Mlundi

| September 2, 2020

Simon Mlundi. (2020). Informal Instant Translation in the Tanzanian Courts: Law Professionals’ Perceptions on the Efficacy of English versus Kiswahili in Adjudication of Justice. International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse 8(1), 25-45. Abstract: It is widely known that language plays a fundamental role in the administration of justice. Court languages in Tanzania are Kiswahili […]

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